Sunday, March 02, 2008

time-consuming appliances


This is a legendary mixer post.

Sharp readers already will have zeroed in on the ambiguous adjectival construction in the previous sentence. Props to you.

Meet the Deluxe family's Hobart C-100 10 quart mixer. It does not have a pet name. It does have an exploded view. =>

Suitable pet names would include Bertha, Dreadnought, Neaddought, L'Utile, and GL'Utile.













I brought the mixer out its mixer kennel to meet you. I discovered that it weighs 96 lbs. All muscle.



















A big mixer [a small commercial mixer] has been an object of desire in the Deluxe household since way back when.








My potter friend Alex gave me the C-100 in June 2006. I was giddy. But my bride wasn't sure that a 100 lb vintage mixer from a friend's barn qualified as a dream come true.
It did have a few problems.

The lifter arm [25, above] had become welded by corrosion to the cast iron body. It would not lift.

Was the solution more force? Sometimes that's all that is needed. When forced, it indeed did move a bit, then more. Then, too much; it broke off flush with the frame. A degiddying setback.

Drilling and hammering were the bones and bowels of Plan B. And pondering and cussing. A heat gun perhaps. In time I made a new lifter arm and the rehabilitated C-100 moved into the pantry in the fall of 2006.

It may be 25 years or more since Hobart stopped making the C-100. It is hard to find good information on the model. I joined a newsgroup for a while called "We actually collect electric mixers." A jolly, privileged group, they actually didn't collect C-100s.

But I do see these machines purring away at fairs and boardwalks, making batter for fried dough sellers. Like all planetary gear Hobart motors, the C-100 is essentially bombproof, except for the Achillean lifter arm.

If you are looking for the C-100 diagrams featured in this post, try here: catserv1.itwfeg.com/Hobart-Root/cart.cfm

[Update from Joe: The above method to see the C-100 manuals is broken. Try this instead:
http://kitchen.manualsonline.com/mdownloads/dae76a95-8d9b-440f-b806-2b70b6ffc2a7.pdf]


Aftermarket bowls and beaters still are made but they are pricey. One interesting fact is that the hub for attachments that mount on the front is the same size as the common KitchenAid stand mixer. A No. 10 tapering hub. Named for the C-10, common ancestor of the C-100 and the KitchenAid. That wasn't interesting for you?

I use the mixer every week to make dough for bread and pizza. We use spelt flour. If you have come here to read about spelt flour, I'll tell you to order your flour from www.dakota-prairie.com 50 lb bags of flour via UPS. It's the way to do it.





So this weekend, as is typical, bread was made. A pleasant sourdough 80/20 spelt/rye.

With 20 oz. of extra dough Big One and Little One made some crackers. They shared the rolling and cutting and all the rest.

According to B.O. and L.O., this qualifies as homeschooling.









I concur.





7 comments:

sandy said...

Your C-100 is cool. Hot. Really, I want one. I don't need one, but I want one. Do they have junk yards for these things so you can get replacement parts? C U Pull it.

Granna Judy said...

Well, I totally don't want one but I love seeing the crackers the O's made. It never occurred to me that you could make crackers out of bread dough -- how dumb is that?

elsie deluxe said...

Well, it might not be quite so dumb. Making crackers out of bread dough falls into the category of "experimental cooking." They were so hard that we were referring to them as Hagrid's rock cakes, although they all got eaten. It is my belief that they would have been helped by the addition of a large amount of fat. But then, what wouldn't be helped by that?

Zachary said...

Hey what's the max capacity for these things?
(number of loaves of bread or muffins...)
Thanks!

Joe Deluxe said...

It is a 10 quart mixer, so it is about twice the capacity of most KitchenAid-type countertop stand mixers.

I can make 4 2-lb. loaves of bread at a time. I double cookie recipes. I can make a lot of hummus.

Some day I want to see how many egg whites I can whip!

km said...

It's great what you're doing with the Hobart...can you really make smooth hummus with it? I thought one had to use a food processor or blender to make smooth hummus.

alan said...

I put C100 into Google and came across your Blog. I picked up the same mixer at a flea market for $50 with no 3rd speed. Took it apart and fixed it. Now I need a new bowl and need to strip off the hand painted kelly green house paint. Gonna make some bread one of these days...